So recently a point/counterpoint set of articles came out on lifehacker. Basically they do these articles every so often, I guess. But I think before we think about the merits of the debate I want to look at the comments.

Yeah, as you might imagine there is a lot of discussion amongst the commenters about how one article is wrong or right, how gaming PCs aren't so expensive, or how console games aren't bug-free. The question is: who cares?

The articles weren't "this is what I believe, now try to prove me wrong." These were two people with different opinions explaining why they play on the platforms they do. This sort of grinds my gears because this was a set of articles talking about their personal experiences.

See, I have my own personal experiences that lead to me playing on console now. I don't think people who play on PC are in any way "doing it wrong" and I would hope people wouldn't try to "correct" my experiences. I mean it doesn't take a course in philosophy to understand that.

But this whole thing is a matter of faith. You have to have faith in yourself and any time someone else's faith doesn't fit yours people find problems. I won't argue buyer's remorse, or straight up fanboyism. It's just a matter of understanding people and how they feel about things.

And there are these discussions we can have in life that make us better. They aren't about one side winning or losing, but about understanding a perspective. And instead of commenters saying "interesting, I too feel X because in my life" you see these "well actually you aren't right about X." It's just one of those internet things, people missing a great opportunity on a mass scale.

But part of this can only be understood with some contest. These people didn't just start out this way, they weren't born PC players or Console enthusiasts, they all took part in our social history with these devices. Culture is this weird idea, it's definitely concrete at times, but how people participate in creating culture is quite different. People often do know they're in the middle of an era, right?

This modern gaming era is one of those things, there have been massive changes technologically and financially in the past decades and one way of looking at this is through this modern past-time of playing games. But more than that, as an element of that culture what and how you play says something about your position in this climate.

So you get the PC master race jokes and every thing else because people want to identify with something. In my mind, though, especially on the net people shouldn't let these things divide them. And they shouldn't try to negate others experiences. If we're going to be doing anything it's to listen to what people are saying and attempt to really understand why people play the way they do, because it might actually tell us something about our world, and God forbid on the internet, other people.